Moses and Smith file for Coleman Chief of Police

Jay Moses, incumbent, 1015 W. Walnut, has filed for Chief of Police.

Anthony Smith, 309 Santa Anna Ave, has filed for Chief of Police.

Filing will remain open until February 17, 2017. General Election will be held on
May 6, 2017. 

McGee, Merriman file for Council; Sloan files for Mayor

Bobby McGee, 415 E. 6th St, has filed for East Ward Place 3 position.

Carolyn Merriman, incumbent, 603 W. College, has filed for West Ward Place 2
position.

Tommy Sloan, 1307 Hillcrest, has filed for Mayor position. (picture to follow).

Filing will remain open until February 17, 2017. General Election will be held on May 6, 2017.

Tractor Supply is officially open for business

Tractor Supply is officially open for business
Magen Rutledge, Jay Delgadillo, Tina Brough, Madison Wise, Keira Dewey, Patrick Matteucci, Destiny Goldberg, Dana Taylor, Jed Herrod Renee Lefevre, Marlana Flores, Hailey Hinds and Brandon Biggs.

Brandon Biggs, manager of Coleman’s new Tractor Supply, was at the ready with hot coffee and cookies Friday evening to greet the first customers to a special preview. All thirteen employees were available to help customers with questions and transactions.

Tractor Supply officially opened to the public Saturday, January 14. The Coleman County Chamber of Commerce will be on hand Saturday January 21 at 10am for the ribbon cutting and Grand Opening. Radio station 105.1 KEEN FM will be there for a live feed, the Humane Society of Coleman County will be there for a pet adoption drive, and a magician will arrive at 11am to entertain. Tractor Supply will offer 10% off entire first purchase, gift cards totaling $2,000, and free hats for the first 600 customers.

Commissioner Miller Honors Sarita Short From Valera With January ‘GROW’ Award

Agriculture Commissioner Sid Miller is pleased to honor Sarita Short, a senior from Panther Creek Consolidated Independent School District (Panther CISD) in Valera, Texas, as the winner of the Texas Department of Agriculture’s monthly GROW award. The award Gives Recognition for Outstanding Work to middle and high school students who demonstrate leadership and excellence inside and outside the classroom.

“I’d like to say how proud I am of Sarita for earning this month’s GROW award,” Commissioner Miller said. “Young Texans like Sarita make me hopeful for the future of our great state. She’s got the talent and the drive to succeed that has been fueling success in Texas for hundreds of years. Way to go, Sarita!”

Sarita was chosen from hundreds of Texas students for demonstrating leadership and academic success in her school activities, as well as her commitment to community service.

“It is a true honor to be selected as the Texas Department of Agriculture's January 2017 GROW award winner,” Sarita said. “I would like to thank the many people who have helped me develop not only as a person, but as an agriculturist. I love the agriculture industry, and hope to stay in it as I continue on to the next chapter of my life. I would like to send my most special thanks to the Texas Department of Agriculture for allowing me to represent them.”

Sarita was nominated for the GROW award by Cindy Dockter, her agriculture teacher.

“I have had the privilege of watching this beautiful young lady grow, mature and prosper over the last 10 years,” Dockter said. “She envelops the definition of leader throughout her school, church and community. Sarita Short is truly an exceptional student that encompasses premier leadership, personal growth and career success.”

Sarita has been participating in stock shows since she was in third grade. Throughout her high school years, she has excelled and grown into a tremendous force. Sarita is the president of her school’s FFA chapter and served as a district FFA officer last year. She has also qualified for the Area IV leadership contest every year in high school and has been in the top five at the area horse judging contest the last three years. Sarita has been very successful with her lamb projects that she has shown through FFA. She has won champion fine wool at the Sandhills Stock Show, and had reserve champion fine wool at Austin and San Angelo stock shows. Dockter said her success is due to her hard work and many hours of dedication to her projects throughout the years.

Additionally, Sarita is the president of Student Council and is a leader on her basketball team. When she’s not leading her team, she’s mentoring younger players to help them improve their skills. Outside of the basketball court, you’ll find Sarita qualifying for the state track meet, where she participates in the 100 and 200 meter dashes. Because of her dedication to the sport, she has had the honor of standing on the medal stand twice at the state track meet.

Furthermore, Sarita participates in One-Act play and was voted best actress and all-star cast at district and area. She has been a part of the Coleman County Cowgirls — a drill team — for the past five years. She was also the Coleman County Rodeo Queen last year. Sarita also gives back to her community by volunteering at the Dove Fest and Hunter's Barbeque. She is a member of the First United Methodist Church in Coleman. She volunteers for vacation bible school and is a member of the choir.

In addition to being involved in numerous activities, Sarita maintains an A average, is on the honor roll and a member of the National Honor Society. She is also taking twelve hours this semester through Cisco Junior College.

After graduation, Sarita plans to attend Texas Tech University and major in animal science with a minor in agricultural communications.

For more on Sarita’s accomplishments, click here. The Texas Department of Agriculture established the GROW award to celebrate outstanding student leaders who demonstrate excellence in either their academic or extracurricular activities. Students can be nominated by community leaders such as teachers, coaches, school administrators, mayors, county judges or anyone else committed to recognizing youth leadership and achievement.

Martinez files to run in Place 2 - CISD Trustee Election

Martinez files to run in Place 2 - CISD Trustee Election

MARK MARTINEZ has filed to run for re-election for Place 2 on the Coleman ISD Board of Trustees.  He has served on the board since 2008.

The deadline to file an application for a place on the ballot is Friday, February 17th.  The general election will be held May 6, 2017.

Special Livestock Show Edition

Don't miss this week's special edition of the Coleman Chronicle & DV.

Copies are available in the office at 204 W. Pecan, Shoppin' Baskit, Wes-T-Go, Buddy's, 7-11 (North Side & Commercial), Tres Amigos, Elkins, Santa Anna Grocery and West Side Market & Laundry!

FM 1026 BETWEEN US 67 AND SH 206 TO BE CLOSED FOR RAILROAD CROSSING MAINTENANCE

COLEMAN – The Texas Pacífico Railroad (TXPF) continues railroad crossing maintenance work in Coleman County. Contractors for the railroad are scheduled to perform replanking operations on Farm to Market Road 1026 between US 67 and State Highway 206 from Tuesday, Jan. 31 through Thursday, Feb. 2.

During this period, a short section of FM 1026 will be closed to traffic as TXPF crews perform maintenance upgrades to the railroad crossing, including the installation of new concrete rail planks across the highway. This work is similar to maintenance performed at the railroad’s crossing at FM 503 south of Valera earlier in January.

Through traffic on FM 1026 will be detoured via US 67 and SH 206. Motorists are reminded that traffic fines are doubled in work zones while workers are present.

The dates and times of the scheduled closure are subject to change based on weather conditions. Updates will be communicated as needed via news releases and on the TxDOT Brownwood Twitter feed, @TxDOTBWD.

TxDOT’s Brownwood District includes Brown, Coleman, Comanche, Eastland, Lampasas, McCulloch, Mills, San Saba and Stephens counties.

For news media inquiries regarding the road closure and detour, contact Andrew.Carlson@TxDOT.gov or (325) 643-0413. Media inquiries regarding the nature of the work being performed on the railroad crossing should be directed to TXPF.

Filing to Begin in Coleman ISD 2017 Board of Trustees Election

The Coleman Independent School District General Trustee Election will occur on May 6, 2017. The School Board consists of seven Trustees elected at-large to serve three year terms. Members are elected by position with terms staggering a three year cycle. Places 1, 2 and 3 are scheduled for election this year.  The current board members in the Places up for election are Jody Payne, Place 1, Mark Martinez, Place 2, and John Casey, Place 3.

Election filing begins Wednesday, January 18, 2017. Candidates are required to file an application for a place on the ballot by the filing deadline. The last day to file for a place on the ballot is Friday, February 17, 2017 at 5 p.m. Candidates shall submit their Application for Place on the Ballot to the Coleman ISD Administration Office located at 2302 S. Commercial Avenue, Coleman, Texas 76834 between the hours of 8 a.m. and 4:00 p.m., Monday through Friday.  For more information, please contact the Coleman ISD Administration Office at 325-625-3575.

Important Dates

  • First Day to File for a place on the Ballot – Wednesday, January 18, 2017
  • Last Day to File for a place on the Ballot – Friday, February 17, 2017 at 5 p.m.
  • Last Day to Register to Vote in the May 6, 2017 General Election – Thursday, April 6, 2017
  • Early Voting by Personal Appearance – Monday, April 24, 2017 to Tuesday, May 2, 2017
  • Election Day – Saturday, May 6, 2017

USDA Farm Service Agency Expands Bridges to Opportunity Nationwide

WASHINGTON, Jan. 11, 2017 — The U.S. Department of Agriculture’s (USDA) Farm Service Agency (FSA) today announced the expansion of a unique service for farmers and ranchers. FSA’s Bridges to Opportunity program provides a one-stop-shop that connects producers with resources, programs and educational services offered across the department, as well as from other USDA partner organizations. Bridges to Opportunity, which currently provides enhanced customer support to more than 150,000 customers in 20 states, will expand to serve customers across the country before the end of the month using fiscal year 2016 funds.

“By partnering with numerous local, state, regional and national agricultural organizations, FSA employees now can provide farmers and ranchers with comprehensive information about resources, grants, courses, events and activities provided throughout USDA and from external partner organizations,” said FSA Administrator Val Dolcini. “Bridges to Opportunity is another example of how USDA is working to reconnect people to their government and provide enhanced services to farmers and ranchers, who, in turn, provide our nation and the world with safe, affordable and reliable food, fuel and fiber.”

FSA’s presence in over 2,100 county offices, in nearly every rural county, puts the agency in a unique position to partner with non-governmental organizations to reach thousands of agricultural producers who can benefit from the programs and services.  Bridges to Opportunity allows FSA employees to search and obtain a list of all local, state, regional and national organizations that may be able assist local producers with their specific need.  For example, FSA’s Houston County office in Texas partnered with many agricultural organizations to serve producers affected by severe drought.  When drought-stricken agricultural producers came to the county office looking for assistance, FSA employees were able to provide traditional services, such as the Livestock Forage Disaster Program (LFP) and the Emergency loan program administered by FSA, as well as connect local farmers with local, regional, and national organizations that provide drought assistance and education.

Bridges to Opportunity was developed by FSA to provide producers with a more comprehensive customer service experience by connecting them with other USDA agencies and nonfederal partners. Through Bridges to Opportunity, FSA county office employees have the tools to connect farmers, ranchers and anyone interested in agriculture with customized expertise on topics ranging including organic production, beginning farmer resources, integrated pest management, disaster assistance, conservation practices, agricultural educational courses, loans, grants and other financial assistance that can start, grow or benefit farming and ranching operations.

“Bridges to Opportunity embodies FSA's modernized approach to customer service. By providing a broader array of resources than FSA or USDA alone, FSA is bringing farmers and ranchers one step closer to achieving their version of the American Dream,” said Dolcini.

For more information about Bridges to Opportunity, please contact your local FSA county office. To locate your FSA county office, please see https://offices.usda.gov.

Over the past eight years, USDA has taken big, bold steps to forge a new era for civil rights and ensure all Americans who come to USDA for help are treated fairly, with dignity and respect. Through coordinated outreach and consistent engagement, USDA is forming new partnerships in diverse communities and regaining trust where it was once lost. Learn more about our progress during the Obama Administration to increase access to opportunity for all Americans, and to create a more equal and inclusive USDA in chapter 8 of our yearlong results project: The People’s Department: A New Era for Civil Rights at USDA.

Buck’s Q & Catering begin operation in Coleman

Buck’s Q & Catering begin operation in Coleman
Members of the Coleman Chamber of Commerce celebrated at Buck’s Q and Catering on Friday, January 6, by cutting the ceremonial ribbon.

By Trena Claywell
Coleman Chronicle & DV


Despite freezing temperatures and snow flurries, the Coleman County Chamber of Commerce held a ribbon cutting ceremony for Buck’s Q and Catering on Friday, Jan. 6. Longtime Brown County residents Ricky and Melissa McDaniel have turned their attentions on Coleman. Several months ago, Ricky underwent neck surgery and to help stave off the boredom of recovery, he began to smoke meats in his backyard.

McDaniel had been catering and entering barbecue competitions for the past four months. He wanted to open a restaurant but found the cost of doing business in Brown County too high. Coleman became his focus because of its central location, inexpensive rentals, and Coleman’s need for more restaurant choices, especially barbecue.

McDaniel and his family moved to Coleman the day after Thanksgiving.

For now, the McDaniels are renting the building at 1216 North Neches, but they do plan on purchasing the property. The McDaniels have given the building a fresh, new look while keeping with the original feel of the restaurant formerly known as Coonies, 3K’s, and Babes. Many will recognize the rock counter that has been scrubbed and finished.

Buck’s Q and Catering was named after Ricky’s grandfather, George Washington Buckmaster. The face on the logo is the image of Buckmaster himself.

The McDaniels have hired eight employees, including manager Gwen Waight, who is also new to Coleman. She worked at the prison in Big Spring for the past 12 years.

Waight is excited about the new restaurant, her job, and her employers.

“I am very proud of him,” she said. “He has brought much needed jobs to Coleman.”

McDaniel said he is excited to be here in Coleman and looks to source as many goods locally as possible.

“We are trying to do as much business here as we can,” he said.

Buck’s Grand Opening was Tuesday, Jan. 10. Their business hours are Tuesday through Saturday, from 11 a.m. to 9 p.m. The smoker is working overtime to serve up brisket, pork, ribs, and sausage along with plenty of sides. Meat by the pound and family packs are available to go.

USDA Farm Service Agency Expands Bridges to Opportunity Nationwide

WASHINGTON, Jan. 11, 2017 — The U.S. Department of Agriculture’s (USDA) Farm Service Agency (FSA) today announced the expansion of a unique service for farmers and ranchers. FSA’s Bridges to Opportunity program provides a one-stop-shop that connects producers with resources, programs and educational services offered across the department, as well as from other USDA partner organizations. Bridges to Opportunity, which currently provides enhanced customer support to more than 150,000 customers in 20 states, will expand to serve customers across the country before the end of the month using fiscal year 2016 funds.

“By partnering with numerous local, state, regional and national agricultural organizations, FSA employees now can provide farmers and ranchers with comprehensive information about resources, grants, courses, events and activities provided throughout USDA and from external partner organizations,” said FSA Administrator Val Dolcini. “Bridges to Opportunity is another example of how USDA is working to reconnect people to their government and provide enhanced services to farmers and ranchers, who, in turn, provide our nation and the world with safe, affordable and reliable food, fuel and fiber.”

FSA’s presence in over 2,100 county offices, in nearly every rural county, puts the agency in a unique position to partner with non-governmental organizations to reach thousands of agricultural producers who can benefit from the programs and services.  Bridges to Opportunity allows FSA employees to search and obtain a list of all local, state, regional and national organizations that may be able assist local producers with their specific need.  For example, FSA’s Houston County office in Texas partnered with many agricultural organizations to serve producers affected by severe drought.  When drought-stricken agricultural producers came to the county office looking for assistance, FSA employees were able to provide traditional services, such as the Livestock Forage Disaster Program (LFP) and the Emergency loan program administered by FSA, as well as connect local farmers with local, regional, and national organizations that provide drought assistance and education.

Bridges to Opportunity was developed by FSA to provide producers with a more comprehensive customer service experience by connecting them with other USDA agencies and nonfederal partners. Through Bridges to Opportunity, FSA county office employees have the tools to connect farmers, ranchers and anyone interested in agriculture with customized expertise on topics ranging including organic production, beginning farmer resources, integrated pest management, disaster assistance, conservation practices, agricultural educational courses, loans, grants and other financial assistance that can start, grow or benefit farming and ranching operations.

“Bridges to Opportunity embodies FSA's modernized approach to customer service. By providing a broader array of resources than FSA or USDA alone, FSA is bringing farmers and ranchers one step closer to achieving their version of the American Dream,” said Dolcini.

For more information about Bridges to Opportunity, please contact your local FSA county office. To locate your FSA county office, please see https://offices.usda.gov.

Over the past eight years, USDA has taken big, bold steps to forge a new era for civil rights and ensure all Americans who come to USDA for help are treated fairly, with dignity and respect. Through coordinated outreach and consistent engagement, USDA is forming new partnerships in diverse communities and regaining trust where it was once lost. Learn more about our progress during the Obama Administration to increase access to opportunity for all Americans, and to create a more equal and inclusive USDA in chapter 8 of our yearlong results project: The People’s Department: A New Era for Civil Rights at USDA.

Kiwanis Club donates to Coleman FFA

Kiwanis Club donates to Coleman FFA
Tony Beggs (left) accepting the check from Kiwanis Club member, Megan Muscianes.

The Coleman Kiwanis Club recently donated $350 to the Coleman FFA - something they have done since the 1970s.

The money is donated to help defray the costs of ribbons, prizes, etc. for the Coleman Chapter of the livestock show.

Photo courtesy of Steve Autry.

City could 'save millions' with LOI

STAFF REPORT

The City of Coleman may have saved itself a ton of money recently. Ken Martin, an engineer with Jacob and Marketing Engineering, informed members of the Coleman City Council that a move by Coleman Mayor Nick Poldrack will likely pay huge dividends for the city in the future.

According to Martin, Poldrack signed paperwork that allowed the city to lock in a 1.375 percent poverty interest rate on a 40-year loan from the USDA Office of Rural Development without committing to the loan. By signing the Letter of Conditions, Letter of Intent to Meet Conditions, and Request for Obligation of Funds in regards, the city could have the construction of a new water treatment plant to be funded by the United States Department of Agriculture.

Martin pointed out that Coleman was the last city to receive this offer. The new interest rate jumped by at least 1 percent starting January 1.

"It saves millions of dollars in interest," said Martin. "It's essentially like a grant ... The city is very fortunate to get the offer from the USDA. Fortunately the mayor did sign the paperwork."

Toby Terry made a report to the council on needed repairs to the water production plant clarifier. To date, Terry reported the city has spent $5,355 with an expected total to reach near $10,000 to return the clarifier to service.

Additionally, Terry said Guy Bolton agreed to a special rate to the city for a crane, which is needed for the next scheduled repairs. Bolton's usual rate is $400 an hour with a minimum of four hours. The special rate is $275 an hour with a minimum of two hours. In other business, the three lowest bids for Gray Street water line materials were unanimously accepted. Among those submitting bids were Benmark's Supply ($95,803), Starks Construction ($54,650) and CRC Construction ($37,500).

Additionally, sealed bids were opened that would provide for 16 self-contained breathing apparatus with one face piece and one spare cylinder each for the Coleman Fire Department. Bids were then turned over to Coleman Fire Chief David Martinez, who will make a recommendation to the council on Jan. 19 at the next regularly scheduled meeting.

Commissioners vote to keep burn ban off

By Tommy Wells
Coleman Chronicle & DV


The Coleman County Commissioner’s Court didn’t have much to decide on Monday morning at their regular meeting, but what they did decide will likely keep the residents of Coleman County a whole lot happier.

Citing good conditions, the commissioners voted unanimously to maintain keep the burn ban off. The moves makes it legal to conduct outdoor burning activities within reason.

In other action, commissioners voted to give Coleman County Deputy Treasurer Jeana Farrow an increase in wages. Farrow’s salary, which will increase to $15 per hour, had been set at $13.50 per hour during a recently completed 90-day probationary period.
Farrow’s position is a part-time position with no benefits.

The commissioners also indicated they would be making several changes to the county’s personnel manual in the coming days. Among the changes that could be enacted at the commissioner’s court’s in the upcoming week’s will be authorization by county officials to enforce the vacation accrual policy barring county employees from massing more than 129 hours of vacation time, as well as a policy requiring any employee that involved in an accident while operating a county-owned vehicle or equipment be subject to a legally admissible drug test. The county will also look into enforcing its sick leave policy that requires county employees use at least four hours of sick leave time per incident, as well as a policy requiring all new hires in the Road and Bridge department to have Class A CDL licenses.

Reynolds appointed to 4-A board during heated council meeting

By Trena Claywell
Coleman Chronicle & DV


The only new business on the Coleman City Council’s agenda on Thursday, Jan. 5 was the appointment of a new board member to the Coleman Economic Development Board Type 4-A.
And even that didn’t come easy.

The council, which needed to fill a vacancy created due to the resignation of Harold Skelton from the board effective Dec. 31, erupted in a brief war of words  between Bill Henning and Coleman City Manager Paul Catoe.

During the meeting, Roy Poage, President of the 4-A Board, nominated Dr. Paul Reynolds for the vacancy. Poage cited Reynolds’s qualifications for appointment to the board as he has improved Coleman County Medical Center by keeping it open and bringing Preferred Management to manage the hospital. Poage also stated that Reynolds wants Coleman to grow economically and is civic minded.

Hennig spoke in favor of Dr. Mike Edington’s previous nomination of Mark Price for the open board seat. Hennig requested that the council not hold any prejudice against Price for previously pointing out that he was lied to by Catoe because, “Mark is an astute business man who doesn’t suffer fools gladly.”

Catoe interrupted Hennig, asking the mayor to take action against Hennig.

“We have by-laws that prevent citizens from slandering the staff of the city,” Catoe said. “I would like to ask you to call for a motion or call for a point of order to not allow this to happen. That’s slander. It’s not right and I don’t accept it.”

Following Catoe’s objection, Poldrack directed Hennig to keep his remarks focused on Price. Hennig, again, asked the council to not be prejudiced against Price as a candidate, and said the council should speak with him.

Councilman Sherman Smith introduced Price to the council, saying he had asked him to be attend the meeting. Smith noted that Price and his wife, Jane, had bought a farm at White Chapel in 2007. They moved to their farm full-time in 2014. Price recently retired as a drilling superintendent from Shell Oil Company after 34 years. With Shell, he managed an average burn rate of $6 million per day and had 100-125 employees under his direction.
He and his wife opened the Terrace Inn Bed & Breakfast in April 2016. They have also purchased Harbord Court Motel, and plan to begin renovation within the next 30 days. The Prices also have led Vision and Values Workshops for Coleman professionals and for the Coleman County Junior Chamber of Commerce.

“Jane and I are both interested in giving back to the community,” he said.

Councilwoman Carolyn Merriman made a motion in favor of appointing Reynolds to the board, Mayor Pro Tem Gary Payne seconded the motion. Smith and councilman Danny Jameson voted against. Poldrack cast his vote in alliance with Poage to appoint Reynolds to the 4-A Board.

“I appreciate Mr. Price volunteering and all the stuff he has done,” said Poldrack. “It’s kind of a sad deal that a lot of times we have a number of good people that want on the board and we just have one opening.”

Historic Coleman County building facing dire times

By Tommy Wells
Coleman Chronicle & DV


In its heyday, the Valera Community Center saw its share of fun and excitement. During the early years of the 1900s, the red brick building served as the community’s school and later, after consolidation had created the Talpa-Centennial school district, the building continued to play a vital role by hosting various public events and activities for groups through western Coleman County.

Today, the former Valera landmark’s spacious auditorium, kitchen and meeting spaces sits empty on most days with no water or natural gas services. Sadly, a lack of funds combined with a general lack of interest threatens to add another Coleman County icon to the history books.

“I’m afraid for its future,” said long-time caretaker Ken Smith. “We don’t have the money to keep the basic utilities on, and there aren’t that many people who seem interested in using it. I don’t know what the future holds for it.”

“It is a neat old building. I wish we had more interest in it,” he added.

The building, which was constructed in the 1920’s, initial served as the Valera school until the 1940’s. After the school had moved, the property was turned over to the bustling community of more than 500 to serve as a community center.

The past 70 years haven’t been kind to Valera. Since the end of World War II, the community has shrank to approximately 80 residents. In 1985, the Talpa-Centennial and Mozelle school district consolidated to create Panther Creek CISD.

The loss in population has resulted in fewer people seeking to utilize the community center. Today, the building houses a weekly meeting of a local quilting club and, at least once a year, a meeting of the cemetery association.

More pressing than the lack of usage is the lack of funds to keep the facility open, said Smith. Currently, the VCC had less than $150 left in its account. Once that is used, the lights could go off permanently.

“The biggest thing we’re facing is the money to pay the utilities,” he said. “We operate on a donations and whatever we can get. We haven’t really had any big donations in four or five years. It (the account) is getting pretty bare.”

Locally, the Valera Volunteer Fire Department and Valera Baptist Church does what they can to help. The VVFD donates funds twice a year, while the church members try and donate funds each year to help keep the facility operational.

The lack of funds has already robbed the facility of its water services. When the building was constructed, it used a cess pool system. That system has since failed, leaving the building without a sanitation system. A recent water leak forced Smith to have the water turned off.

“If we can’t afford to have the water leak fixed, we certainly couldn’t get a new septic system,” he noted.

Despite it’s issues, Smith the building is structurally sound and offers a great place for meetings and other things.

“If anyone wanted, we’d let them use it for a small fee,” he said. “Anything we raise from having it used goes back into the building.”

Smith said anyone interested in donating to the VCC fund can do sending funds to: Valera Community Center, c/o Ken Smith, P.O. Box 68, Valera, TX 76884. 

Murray, Robertson shine at Santa Anna Livestock Show

By Tommy Wells
Coleman Chronicle & DV


SANTA ANNA - Shelby Murray, Alexis Washington, Levi Daniel and Cody Robertson didn’t win everything at the 2017 Santa Anna Livestock Show on Saturday afternoon. But it sure seemed like it.

The four Santa Anna students highlighted the annual event by walking away with some of the afternoon’s top awards. They also established themselves as potential favorites at the upcoming Coleman County Livestock Show.

Despite cool temperatures, more than 30 exhibitors showed more than 50 animals at the show, which was held in the Santa Anna ISD show barn. Exhibitors at the show are eligible to compete in the county show, which is scheduled for later this month in Coleman.

Murray capped her high school livestock career with a perfect ending. The Santa Anna senior showed the grand champion in the Steer competition. Her champion heavyweight Hereford edged out six other entrants to claim the top spot.

“It feels pretty good to win,” said Murray, who showed the reserve champion last year. “I’m a senior so it’s my last year to show. I guess I went out with a bang.”

Chloe Guerrero took the reserve champion honors in the Steer division. Her black steer had won the lightweight classification, edging out Brandon Craig and her sister, Kylie Guerrero.
Guerrero did net a win later in the show, taking the Senior Showmanship honors in the Steer division. Craig won the Junior Showmanship accolades.

If Murray finished her career with a bang, Robertson began his high school experience with an explosion. A freshman at Santa Anna High School, he nailed down his third straight grand championship title in the Sheep division, as well as showing the breed grand champion in the Lightweight OPB, Lightweight Black OPB and Lightweight Cross events, and the reserve champion in the Gilt competition.

“I’m definitely a little surprised I did as well as I did,” said Robertson, the son of Shannon Robertson and Benny Bible. “I didn’t work with them as much as I had wanted, but it turned out OK. I’m pleased with how they did.”

In the Sheep classification, Robertson’s entry won the Medium Wool division and later was crowned the grand champion. Madison Wise’s Fine Wool Cross winner was tabbed the reserve grand champion.

Hannah Parson earned the Junior Showmanship honors, while Robertson was awarded the Senior Showmanship title.
Robertson’s Yorkshire entry was the reserve grand champion in the Gilt show. Daniel won the grand champion honors in the event.

Daniel came back later to claim the grand champion accolades in the Hampshire and Duroc categories. Taylor Guerrero’s entry was the reserve grand champion in the Hampshire class, while Washington was the reserve champion in the Duroc division.
Washington emerged as the top exhibitor in the Swine division. She netted the grand champion honors with her Heavyweight Cross entry. Daniel was second.

Brianna Michon won the Rabbits division as well as the Senior Showmanship honors.

Katie Crowder was the Junior Showmanship winner in the Rabbits division.

2017 Santa Anna Livestock Show
Held Jan. 7, 2017 at the Santa Anna ISD Show Barn
STEER DIVISION
Lightweight Steers
Kloey Guerrero
Brandon Craig
Kylee Guerrero
Louis Olguin
Heavyweight Steers
Shelbie Murray
Travis Craig
GRAND CHAMPION STEER: Shelbie Murray
RESERVE GRAND CHAMPION STEER: Kloey Guerrero
JUNIOR SHOWMANSHIP: Brandon Craig
SENIOR SHOWMANSHIP: Kloey Guerrero

RABBITS
Beanna Michon
Ellie McIver
Katie Crowder
Nick Crowder
GRAND CHAMPION: Breanna Michon
RESERVE GRAND CHAMPION: Ellie McIver
JUNIOR SHOWMANSHIP: Katie Crowder
SENIOR SHOWMANSHIP: Breanna Michon

GOATS
Lightweight
Abigail Petrosky
Ella Crowder
Cody Roberston
Cody Robertson
Brandon Craig
Middleweight
Ella Crowder
Ella Crowder
Carson Keeney
Elijah Petrovsky
Katelyn Craig
GRAND CHAMPION: Ella Crowder
RESERVE GRAND CHAMPION: Grand Champion: Abigail Petrosky
JUNIOR SHOWMANSHIP: Ella Crowder
SENIOR SHOWMANSHIP: Carson Keeney

LAMB
Fine Wool
Makayla Wise
Madison Wise
Fine Wool Cross
Madison Wise
Makayla Wise
Southdown
Hannah Parson
Medium Wool Lightweight
Cody Robertson
Cody Robertson
Medium Wool Heavyweight
Cody Robertson
Makayla Wise
Madison Wise
Cody Robertson
Alexis Washington
GRAND CHAMPION: Cody Robertson
RESERVE GRAND CHAMPION: Cody Robertson
JUNIOR SHOWMANSHIP: Hannah Parson
SENIOR SHOWMANSHIP: Cody Robertson

SWINE
Gilt Division
GRAND CHAMPION: Levi Daniel
RESERVE GRAND CHAMPION: Cody Robertson
Hampshire Division

Lightweight Hampshire
Levi Daniel
Kylee Guerrero
Braegan Glasscoack
Alexis Washington
Medium weight Hampshire
Taylor Guerrero
Cody Robertson
Taylor Allen

Heavyweight Hampshire
Levi Daniel
Dylan DeLeon
Grand Champion Hampshire: Levi Daniel
Reserve Grand Champion: Taylor Guerrero
Duroc Division

Lightweight Duroc
Makayla Wise
Trace Garrett
Larkin Glasscock
Brianna Michon

Heavyweight Duroc
Levi Daniel
Alexis Washington
Grand Champion Duroc: Levi Daniel
Reserve Grand Champion Duroc: Alexis Washington

WOPB Division
Lightweight OPB
Cody Robertson
Alexis Washington
Paris Guerrero

Heavyweight OPB
Nevah Potter
Cody Robertson
Sydney Tucker
Breanna Michon

Grand Champion OPB: Cody Robertson
Reserve Grand Champion OPB: Nevah Potter

BOPB Division
Lightweight Black OPB
Cody Robertson
Cody Robertson
Lisa Marie Gomez

Heavyweight Black OPB
Alexis Washington
Levi Daniel
Alexa DeLeon
Grand Champion Black OPB: Cody Robertson
Reserve Grand Champion Black OPB: Alexis Washington

Cross Division
Lightweight Cross
Cody Robertson
Madison Wise
Sydney Tucker
Alexis Washington

Heavyweight Division
Alexis Washington
Madison Diaz
Levi Daniel
Trace Garrett
Grand Champion Cross: Alexis Washington
Reserve Grand Champion Cross: Madison Diaz
GRAND CHAMPION SWINE: Alexis Washington
RESERVE GRAND CHAMPION SWINE: Levi Daniel
JUNIOR SHOWMANSHIP: Paris Guerrero
SENIOR SHOWMANSHIP: Cody Robertson

CLICK HERE FOR A GALLERY OF PHOTOS.

Coleman ISD School Board Recognition Month

Coleman ISD School Board Recognition Month
Front: Harold Skelton, Secretary; Mark Martinez, President and Jody Payne, Vice President. Back: Sandra Rose, Mike Barker, John Casey and Becky Dobbins.

January is School Board Recognition Month and Coleman ISD will join other districts across the state to thank these local leaders for their dedication and willingness to serve as advocates for our children and public schools. As elected officials, they are the voice of their communities, serving first and foremost in the best interest of Texas schoolchildren.

“Even though we are making a special effort in January to show appreciation to our board members, we realize their many contributions reflect a year-round commitment. They generously give of themselves to ensure that decisions directly affecting our local schools are made by representatives of this community, people who are close to our schools and know our teachers, parents, and students,” said Skip McCambridge, Coleman ISD superintendent.

“Board members shoulder critical responsibilities and often make difficult choices. Their ultimate goal is always focused on the future success of the children in our district,” McCambridge said. “It’s more important than ever before that the public supports our schools so that today’s students are prepared to be productive citizens and the leaders of tomorrow. Our board members provide vision and leadership in their roles as advocates, and they will continue to stand up for public education and guard against anything that takes away from our children,” he said.

The Board of Trustees has successfully lead Coleman ISD this past year.
Leadership through the selection process for a new superintendent.
Balanced budget that included a 2% pay increase for employees, $500 special stipend for all employees, new marquee and a new bus.

Improvements to the transportation fleet and building facilities.

Support to the CISD national qualified Rocket Team.

Board members serving Coleman ISD are
Mark Martinez, President
Jody Payne, Vice President
Harold Skelton, Secretary
Mike Barker
John Casey
Becky Dobbins
Sandra Rose

“Our district benefits from the tireless work and countless hours contributed by these local citizens who work without pay. Serving as a crucial link between the community and classroom, this board is responsible for an annual budget of $ 10 million, 870 students, 187 employees, and 3 campuses. Please help us thank these dedicated volunteers for their efforts to make a difference and their unfailing commitment to the continued success of our students now and in the future,” he said.

Save the date!

The Coleman Chronicle & DV in conjunction with the Friends of the Library will host a book signing for Ralph Terry in honor of his new book Looking Backwards: Volume 2. Join Ralph in the Tillman Room of the Coleman Public Library on January 28th from 2-4pm. Copies of Looking Backwards: Volume 2 will be available for purchase at the event. The Friends of the Library will provide refreshments.

Scotty Lawrence sworn in as Coleman County Precinct 3 Commissioner

Scotty Lawrence sworn in as Coleman County Precinct 3 Commissioner

Today, January 3, 2017 marks Scotty Lawrence's first day as commissioner.

Lawrence won the general election in November, in a runoff against Davey Thweatt.

Scotty has worked for Precinct 3 for nearly 7 years, blading and fixing roads. He plans to keep working on the roads as commissioner.

Also being sworn in today was Joe Lee Rose, County Attorney; Heath Hemphill, District Attorney; Mark Williams, Commissioner Precinct 1; and Jamie Trammell, Tax Assessor Collector.

Sheriff Cogdill sworn in Sunday

Sheriff Cogdill sworn in Sunday

Sheriff Les Cogdill was sworn in on Sunday, January 1, 2017 by Justice of the Peace, Nance Campbell.

Sheriff Cogdill started his law enforcement career as a dispatcher for the Coleman PD. Cogdill then became a full time peace officer with Coleman PD in 1997, after attending the West Central Texas Law Enforcement Academy.

In 2001, Les was promoted to Sergeant, followed by a promotion to Detective Sergeant in 2006.

In 2008, Cogdill was hired by Sheriff Wade Turner as a Deputy. In 2016, Sheriff Turner announced his retirement, so Les decided to run for that position. He won the Republican primary election in May, and was uncontested in the general election in November.

Les will have four deputies serving under him, Archie Lancaster, Kenny Nabers, Johnny Barkemeyer and Vickie Kemp.

New History of Coleman County is Now Available

New History of Coleman County is Now Available

The Big Day has finally arrived … at least this is what local author, Ralph Terry is feeling.  The long-awaited volume of Coleman County history, “Looking Backwards, 1940-1980,” is finished and arrived back from the publisher on Monday, and will be ready for pick-up beginning Tuesday, December 13, from 9 to 12 and 1 to 5, at Terry Studio, which is the home of Judia and Ralph Terry at 302 W. College Avenue.  For more information see terrystudio.net or call 325-625-5317.

Many local history enthusiasts have already purchased the work during advance sales, and are anxious to get their hands on their copy.  Whether you pre-purchased a copy or wish to purchase a copy, come by the studio beginning on Tuesday.  Copies to be mailed will be sent out over the next week.

The book was completed at 672 pages with over 2800 black and white pictures in an 8 ½ x 11 inch format.  It weighs almost five pounds and is selling for a total price of $53.29.  The cover shows a sample of color pictures available from this time period.  This is a very comprehensive work with much history, as well as pictures.  The Terrys will have other books they have written and illustrated on hand for sale, including one children’s book which Judia illustrated.

Terry worked on this compilation for over forty years, collecting history and photographs of Coleman County.  The past five years, he spent several hours almost every day organizing and writing the book.  For the past two years, he spent six to ten hours each day, doing the photographic work for the book, compiling and scanning negatives and photographs that were in his files, and doing the final rewriting of the book.

Anyone who enjoys reading and viewing the history and things past of Coleman County will appreciate the long hours and frustrating work that went into the compilation of this work.  Every county in Texas and the United States has a history similar to our county, although each is unique in its on course, but this is our own past.  It is Terry’s hope that his readers and future generations of readers will enjoy this volume for many years to come.

Panther Creek Basketball Schedule

Panther Creek Basketball Schedule

Fine Arts League of Coleman - Artist of the Month
Janice Hipsher

<span class="font-size-s">Fine Arts League of Coleman - Artist of the Month</span><br><em>Janice Hipsher</em>

Janice Hipsher is the featured artist of the month of December for the Fine Arts League of Coleman County.  Janice was always the "one" with the camera in hand.  When her son started an art gallery a few years ago, he approached her with the idea of enlarging and framing her pictures, this was the start of Life's Delights Photography!

She has been published in Texas Highways Magazine, selected for several contests, been on the cover of Native Plant Society magazines, three covers of the Coleman County phonebook, two covers for the Central Texas Farm Credit Assoc. Annual Report, her Dotted Checkerspot butterfly photo is featured on the Moths and Butterflies of North America's website. She had limited items in the Botanical Research Center in Ft. Worth until the gift shop was downsized to just books.  You will see her work in their store Life's Delights in Santa Anna, Coleman County Chamber office, Rocking R Steakhouse, Double H Two, and yes---Buc-ees!  The big superstores are carrying some of their prints, next time you find yourself in Buc-ees check the framed photos out!  Janice has received several awards from the Fine Arts League of Coleman County and the most exciting one was the People's Choice Award in 2016.

Janice's canvas wrap photo of a bluebonnet will be on exhibit at Bonneville, 304 S. Commercial the month of December.  Bonneville is open on Thursday, Friday and Saturday from 10 to 5.

Bonneville is a unique and beautiful retro store in Coleman, the owner, Bonnie Hennig has a passion for mid-century modern furniture and decor and her shop is a step back in time.  Take time to go by and experience the unique and beautiful items for sale and Janice's art.

CityCouncil120116

CityCouncil120116

This video is from Coleman City Council meeting 12/1/16. This video is of Agenda Item 1 under New Business. It has not been edited for content. There are, however, small portions missing due to technical difficulties. This is not a professional video. It is for informational purposes only. Property of Coleman Chronicle & Democrat Voice